News Headlines

for ALDA-Peach

The Atlanta chapter of the Association of Late-Deafened Adults

 

 News Headlines

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Upcoming
ALDA-Peach meeting in June

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Georgia Relay 2016 Award Nominations

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2016 Scholarships available from Hamilton Relay!

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Give CapTel for the Holidays!

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Big Changes at the Georgia Relay Center

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Brendan Underwood Georgia Relay

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Disability Act:
25 years

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Abby Synowsky Receives Scholarship

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Carrie_Welter Receives 2015 Award

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Better Hearing and Speech Month

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Georgia Relay Seeks Nominations for Award

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Introducing the CapTel 2400i

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Georgia Relay Town Hall Meeting

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Bob Green Wins Award!

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Jeff Bonnell receives award

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Receive Captions on every call with CapTel

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Georgia Relay Spring Outreach Events

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Introducing the Hamilton CapTel Call Me #

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Hamilton Relay 2013 Recognition Award

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Georgia Relay Partner: Keeping Connected

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Hamilton Relay 2013 Scholarship

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Hearing Loops and Telecoils

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Introducing the New CapTel 840i

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The Gift of CapTel

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Mobil CapTel
lets users
see what they say

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Hamilton now has a free iPhone App

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Georgia Relay on People to People

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Captioned Telephone - “See What They Say”

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CapTel Improving Lives

 

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Ten-Digit Numbers

 

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CapTel Service

 

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ALDA-Peach (Atlanta) News

 

 

 

ALDA-Peach meeting in June:
Saturday, June 10, 2017 at 2:00 pm

Interacting With The Police!

(We are meeting every other month during 2017)

 

Do you know how to communicate effectively with the police?

Do you know your rights if you are stopped or arrested?

Please join us as we explore this important topic.

 

Join us on Saturday, June 10, 2017 at 2:00 pm at the Lawrenceville Road United Methodist Church at 3142 Lawrenceville Highway, Tucker, GA

 All of our meetings are captioned, free and open to the public.

Bring a snack to share if you like. 
We can refresh ourselves with food AND company!

We look forward to seeing you there!

 

(You can click here for the address, a map and directions from where you live)

 

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Georgia Relay Seeks Nominations for 2016 Better Hearing and Speech Month Recognition Award

 

Nominations Due by Friday, April 1

 

Hamilton Relay, the contracted service provider of Georgia Relay, is seeking candidates for the 2016 Better Hearing and Speech Month Recognition Award. We are looking for individuals who are hard of hearing, late-deafened or have difficulty speaking and who have been positive influences in Georgia. These individuals should demonstrate commitment to volunteerism, advocacy, leadership and enhancing the lives of those around them. The award will be presented during Better Hearing and Speech Month in May.

 

If there is someone you wish to nominate, please visit HamiltonRelay.com to download and complete a brief questionnaire about your candidate, including a brief description about the individual and why you are nominating him/her. Please send your nominations to Brendan Underwood, Georgia Relay outreach coordinator, by Friday, April 1. Brendan can be reached at 678-620-6776 (Voice/TTY) or brendan.underwood@hamiltonrelay.com.

 

Celebrating community leaders during Better Hearing and Speech Month is something we look forward to each year. We are eager to learn more about the deserving community leaders in your community; nominate someone you know today!

 

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Hamilton Relay Now Accepting Applications for 2016 High School Scholarship Program

 

As the Telecommunications Relay and Captioned Telephone service provider for the State of Georgia, Hamilton Relay acknowledges that opportunities for higher education affect the future of Georgia’s high school students.  

 

We are pleased to once again extend the Hamilton Relay Scholarship opportunity to graduating high school students in Georgia who are deaf, hard of hearing, deaf-blind or have difficulty speaking to assist in their goals of continuing their education. One $500 scholarship will be awarded in each of the states where Hamilton Relay is the contracted telecommunications relay and/or captioned telephone service provider.  

 

To be eligible for the 2016 Hamilton Relay Scholarship Program in Georgia, students must:

  1. Be a graduating high school student who is deaf, hard of hearing, deaf-blind or has difficulty speaking;

  2. Be a resident of Georgia;

  3. Complete and submit an application, a response to the application’s essay question and a letter of recommendation.  

 

If you know a deserving student who meets the eligibility requirements for this scholarship opportunity, please encourage them to submit an application. Applications are available online at www.HamiltonRelay.com and must be postmarked by March 1, 2016 to be considered eligible for selection.

 

For more information, please contact Brendan Underwood, Georgia Relay’s outreach coordinator, at brendan.underwood@hamiltonrelay.com.

 

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Give CapTel for the Holidays

 

If you have difficulty hearing over the telephone, Captioned Telephone (CapTel®) may be the perfect gift for you or someone you know!

 

Now you can stay connected to friends and family during the holidays and all year long. With CapTel, you don’t have to worry about missing what’s said over the phone. CapTel allows you to listen while reading every word the other party says throughout your conversation.

 

Any Georgia resident may purchase a CapTel phone at a specially-reduced price of $75. To order, please call 800-233-9130 (Voice/TTY) or visit http://www.weitbrecht.com/captel-georgia.html.

 

For those who qualify medically and financially, CapTel phones are also available at no cost through the Georgia Telecommunications Equipment Distribution Program. For more information, please call 800-541-0710 (Voice/TTY) or visit http://www.gachi.org/gatedp/.

 

You can also use CapTel on your PC/Mac, smartphone or tablet. Just visit www.HamiltonCapTel.com/Register  to register for a free Hamilton CapTel account, and then download the Hamilton CapTel App to your smartphone or tablet from your app store. Find out which smartphones and wireless networks are compatible by visiting: www.HamiltonCapTel.com and selecting the Smartphone Selector.

 

If you, or a loved one, have difficulty hearing over the phone, give a truly meaningful gift and consider CapTel this holiday season. For more information, please visit www.georgiarelay.org or contact Georgia Relay’s outreach coordinator, Brendan Underwood at brendan.underwood@hamiltonrelay.com.

 

 

 

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Big Changes at the Georgia Relay Center!

 

Big things are happening at the Georgia Relay Center in Albany! This winter, a major expansion project will be completed to greatly increase the size of the center and create more jobs in the region.


The expansion project began last spring and adds 7,200 square feet to the building, bringing the total size of the Georgia Relay Center to 18,000 square feet. The additional room createsGeorgia Relay Center new job opportunities for the Albany area, as the center expects to add as many as 90 positions, including both full-time and part-time Communications Assistants and Captioning Assistants.

The new, expanded center will feature 19 Traditional Relay Service (TRS) seats and 117 CapTel® seats, allowing the center to process more Georgia Relay calls than ever before.

If you or someone you know is deaf, hard of hearing, deaf-blind or has difficulty speaking, there is a state-of-the-art Georgia Relay service designed to meet your needs and lifestyle.

Services include: TTY (text telephone), Voice Carry-Over (VCO), Hearing Carry-Over (HCO), Speech-to-Speech (STS), Spanish Relay, and CapTel.

To make a Georgia Relay call, as always, just dial 7-1-1 from any phone, or call:

                      Traditional Relay:   1-800-255-0056                
  Speech-to-Speech:   1-888-202-4082  
  Spanish Speech-to-Speech:   1-888-202-3972  
  Voice users:   1-800-255-0135  

For more information about Georgia Relay, please visit www.georgiarelay.org.
If you have questions or concerns, please contact Customer Care at
1-866-694-5824 (Voice/TTY) or email
garelay@hamiltonrelay.com.

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Meet Brendan Underwood
Georgia Relay’s New Outreach Coordinator

 

Georgia Relay and Hamilton Relay are pleased to introduce Georgia’s new outreach coordinator, Brendan Underwood! As outreach coordinator, Brendan will be traveling throughout the state to help raise awareness for Georgia Relay TRS and CapTeBrendan Underwoodl, as well as the Georgia Relay Partner Program and the Georgia Telecommunications Equipment Distribution Program.

 

Born and raised in Atlanta, Brendan joins Georgia Relay from the CNN Center, where he spent more than three years as a tour guide. In his time there, he gave more than 3,500 tours and met more than 75,000 guests. In his new position, Brendan looks forward to meeting people from all over the state as he shares information about Georgia Relay.

 

“I am a believer in giving back to the community and helping others, and this job gives me the opportunity to do just that, and I am both honored and humbled to be a part of it,” he says. “My goal is to spread the word about Georgia Relay, and I plan to work diligently to meet people, give presentations, and set up informational booths at community events. I plan to pursue any opportunity that crosses my path to share knowledge about how our services and programs can help people.”

 

Brendan is a graduate of Kennesaw State University with a Bachelor’s degree in Communication. He currently lives in Decatur with his girlfriend, Jessica and his Italian Greyhound, Finn. In his spare time, he enjoys cooking and being active outdoors.

 

To request a free presentation about Georgia Relay, or to invite Georgia Relay to your next public event, please contact Brendan at 678-620-6776 or brendan.underwood@hamiltonrelay.com.

 

 

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The Americans with Disabilities Act:
Celebrating 25 Years

This year marks the 25th anniversary of the signing of the Americans with Disabilities Act which took place on July 26, 1990. This milestone in history was intended "to assure equality of opportunity, full participation, independent living, and economic self-sufficiency for individuals with disabilities." Among other things, the signing of the ADA meant a new opportunity to provide telecommunications relay services, allowing individuals who are deaf, hard of hearing, deaf-blind or who have difficulty speaking to communicate over the telephone.

Georgia Relay is committed to providing quality relay services. Through our outreach efforts, we work to raise awareness and educate communities throughout the state about the variety of relay services available to them. We are proud to serve an important role in providing equal access to telecommunications services in Georgia.

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Abby Synowsky Receives $500 Scholarship From Hamilton Relay

Abby SynowskyAs part of its commitment to give back to the communities it serves, Hamilton Relay, Georgia Relay’s service provider, awards a $500 scholarship each year to one Georgia high school senior who is deaf, hard of hearing, deaf-blind, or has difficulty speaking. This year’s recipient is Abby Synowsky, a student of North Cobb High School from Kennesaw, GA.

Abby was awarded the $500 Hamilton Relay Scholarship after completing the application process, which included writing an essay under the topic of communication technology. Abby plans to attend Georgia Highlands College this fall to study Communication Sciences & Disorders with a goal of becoming a Doctor of Audiology. Congratulations, Abby!

 

 

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Carrie Welter Receives 2015 Better Hearing and Speech Month Recognition Award!

Each May during Better Hearing and Speech Month, Georgia Relay’s service provider, Hamilton Relay, enjoys the opportunity to give back to the communities it serves by recognizing leaders within each of the states where it is the contracted relay and/or captioned telephone service provider. Carrie Welter of Augusta is the recipient of the Hamilton Relay 2015 Better Hearing and Speech Month Recognition Award for the state of Georgia.

Carrie is described by her peers as a strong leader and role model for members of the hard of hearing community. In 1996, Carrie and her husband, Dave, founded the Augusta Chapter of the Hearing Loss Association of America (HLAA). She served as president from March 1997 to September 2001 during which time the Augusta Chapter attracted over 200 members and became the largest HLAA chapter in Georgia, as well as one of the leading chapters in the nation. In 2014, she started the HLAA Bulloch County Chapter in Statesboro and currently serves as a member and leader within that chapter. One mission of the Bulloch County Chapter is to offer support and membership to Georgia Southern University students.

Carrie is a valued advocate and mentor in her community. She has served as an advocate for the installation of audio loops and captioning systems in public places and she is a mentor to individuals with hearing loss. Carrie counsels individuals who are receiving and using hearing aids and assistive listening devices. She also serves as a guide for people are considering cochlear implant surgery. Carrie has truly dedicated herself to helping people live well with hearing loss.

We commend Carrie for her leadership, vision and advocacy on behalf of individuals who are hard of hearing. We are pleased to present her with the Hamilton Relay 2015 Better Hearing and Speech Month Recognition Award for the state of Georgia!

 

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Georgia Relay Recognizes
Better Hearing and Speech Month!

 

Dial 7-1-1 to access free public telephone services for people
who are deaf, hard of hearing, deaf-blind or have difficulty speaking.

 

Georgia Relay recognizes Better Hearing and Speech Month this May. Sponsored by the American Speech-Language Hearing Association (ASHA) since 1927, this annual observation provides opportunities to raise awareness about hearing and speech difficulties and to promote resources that can improve the quality of life for the nearly 40 million Americans who experience difficulty hearing and/or speaking.

 

Georgia Relay provides up-to-date technologies and a variety of assistive devices that enable people in Georgia who are deaf, hard of hearing, deaf-blind or have difficulty speaking to communicate by telephone.  

 

To benefit from Georgia Relay, state residents may take advantage of any of these resources:

  • Dial 7-1-1 to make a Georgia Relay call.
    A free public service, Georgia Relay enables people who are deaf, hard of hearing, deaf-blind or have difficulty speaking to communicate with standard telephone users. Relay services are available 24 hours a day, 365 days a year, and anyone can initiate a Georgia Relay call simply by dialing 7-1-1.

    Georgia Relay offers state-of-the-art features designed with the users’ needs in mind, including traditional Relay (text telephone), Voice Carry-Over (VCO), Hearing Carry-Over (HCO), Speech-to-Speech (STS), Spanish and more. Detailed descriptions and calling instructions for each service are available online at
    www.georgiarelay.org or by calling Georgia Relay customer service at 1-866-694-5824 (V/TTY).

  • See what’s said with Captioned Telephone (CapTel®).
    Georgia Relay CapTel service is designed for individuals who have difficulty hearing on the telephone and are able to speak for themselves. Through the use of a CapTel phone, users listen while viewing word-for-word captions of what’s said to them during phone conversations. Captions appear on the bright, built-in display screen of the CapTel phone just moments after the other party has spoken. You may benefit from CapTel if you are: deaf with understandable speech; someone with a cochlear implant; hard of hearing; a VCO user; a late-deafened adult; or someone who can no longer use an amplified phone.

    CapTel service is provided at no cost to the user. CapTel phones are available at no cost for qualified applicants through the Georgia Telecommunications Equipment Program, or for direct purchase for a reduced cost of $75. Web and mobile versions of CapTel are also available for Mac/PCs, Smartphones and Tablets. To learn more about CapTel, or to purchase a CapTel phone, please visit
    www.georgiarelay.org.

  • Apply for no-cost telecommunications equipment.
    Administered by GACHI, the Georgia Telecommunications Equipment Program (GATEDP) provides telecommunications equipment at no-cost to qualified applicants whose disabilities prevent them from using a standard telephone. Available assistive devices include text telephones (TTYs), amplified telephones, VCO phones, HCO phones, CapTel phones, signalers for the phone and door and more. To learn more about GATEDP or to apply for equipment, please call 1-888-297-9461 (voice/TTY) or visit
    www.GACHI.org/gatedp.

 

In addition, a list of Georgia Relay Partner businesses that are trained in answering and placing Georgia Relay calls is available at www.georgiarelay.org. Georgia Relay’s outreach team also offers free presentations for businesses, organizations and other groups. To request a presentation, please contact Ellen Rolader, Georgia Relay outreach coordinator, at ellen.rolader@hamiltonrelay.com.

 

If you or a loved one has difficulty hearing or speaking over the phone, there are services and equipment available to keep you connected. For more information about Georgia Relay, please visit www.georgiarelay.org or call 1-866-694-5824 (voice/TTY).  

 

 

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Georgia Relay Seeks Nominations for
2015 Better Hearing and Speech Month
Recognition Award

Nominations Due by Wednesday, April 1

Hamilton Relay, the contracted service provider of Georgia Relay, is seeking candidates for the 2015 Better Hearing and Speech Month Recognition Award. We are looking for individuals who are hard of hearing, late deafened or have difficulty speaking and who have been positive influences in Georgia, demonstrating commitment to volunteerism, advocacy, leadership and enhancing the lives of those around them. The award will be presented around Better Hearing and Speech Month in May.

If there is someone you wish to nominate, please visit HamiltonRelay.com to download and complete a brief questionnaire so that we can learn more about their accomplishments. Please send your completed questionnaire to Ellen Rolader, Georgia Relay outreach coordinator, at
ellen.rolader@hamiltonrelay.com by Wednesday, April 1.

Celebrating community leaders during Better Hearing and Speech Month is something we look forward to each year. We are eager to learn more about the community leaders in Georgia; nominate someone you know today!

 

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Introducing the CapTel 2400i

 

 Georgia Relay

The newest addition to the family of CapTel® technology is now available to Georgians with hearing loss – the CapTel 2400i. This phone includes new elements along with a variety of enhancements to its popular features, providing another option for enjoying phone conversations with clarity and confidence!

The CapTel service is the same, offering quality captions through the use of voice recognition technology. With its new touch-screen technology, the 2400i allows users to enjoy a large colorful display with the capability to navigate the menu and dial a number by touching images on the screen.

Check out these great features: CapTel 2400i

  • Large, colorful display with easy touch-screen technology

  • Easy-to-follow menu system

  • Built-in answering machine stores up to 100 messages

  • Adjustable font sizes and colors

  • Amplification and adjustable tone control

  • Bright flashing when phone rings

  • Phone book allows you to easily store and dial more than 95 names and phone numbers

  • Save up to 10 favorite numbers and 4 speed dial numbers

  • Menu options and prompts available in English or Spanish    

 

In addition, the 2400i Captions will default ON automatically, due to recent changes with the Federal Communications Commission (FCC). This means that users will not be required to turn the feature on at the beginning of every call.


Call Georgia Relay Customer Care at 1-866-694-5824 (Voice/TTY) or visit
www.HamiltonCapTel.com for more information about the CapTel 2400i and to learn more
about how to obtain the phone, including the option to purchase it directly for a special reduced price of $75.


CapTel is a registered trademark of Ultratec, Inc.

 

 

 

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Georgia Relay Hosts Town Hall Meeting

On November 5, Georgia Relay hosted a town hall meeting at the Atlanta Speech School. This meeting gave the local community the opportunity to learn more about available telecommunications resources for people who are deaf, hard of hearing, late-deafened, deaf-blind, or have difficulty speaking.

 Georgia Relay Town Hall Meeting

Guest speakers included representatives from Georgia Relay and Hamilton Relay; the Georgia Council for the Hearing Impaired; the Hearing Loss Association of America Georgia State Office; the Georgia Association of the Deaf-Blind; the Georgia Vocational Rehabilitation Agency; Cobb County 911 services, and the Georgia Peach Cochlear Implant Association, among others.

Hamilton Relay and Georgia Relay presented information about Traditional Relay Services, Captioned Telephone Service, Speech-to-Speech Relay Service, the Georgia Telecommunications Equipment Distribution Program, the Relay Friendly Business Program and more.

Georgia Relay would like to give special thanks to everyone who came to network and learn, as well as share their feedback, ideas and suggestions. If you would like to hold a town hall meeting in your community, please contact Ellen Rolader at ellen.rolader@hamiltonrelay.com or 678-620-6776.

 

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Bob Green receives Georgia’s Hamilton Relay
2014 Deaf Community Leader Award!

 Bob Green

Robert “Bob” Green was recently presented with the Hamilton Relay 2014 Deaf Community Leader Award for the state of Georgia. Bob is well known within the Deaf and Deaf-Blind communities for his advocacy and leadership.

Before Bob’s retirement in 2012, he worked for the Georgia Vocational Rehabilitation Agency (GVRA) for over 30 years. His roles there included: evaluator, counselor, and state coordinator for the Deaf-Blind; and he is currently serving his second term as a Governor-appointed board member. Bob also serves on a GVRA committee which educates employers on information around hiring employees who are deaf.

In addition to his work at GVRA, Bob serves many other roles in the local community, including:

  • Rehabilitation Counselor and Deaf-Blind Specialist for the Georgia Sensory Rehabilitation Center (GSRC).

  • Being instrumental in starting the Deaf-Blind Access of the South Camp in 1999 which is held biennially at Camp Dream in Warm Springs, Georgia.

  • Teaching American Sign Language classes for the Interpreter Training Program at Georgia Perimeter College since 1986.

  • Member of the Deaf Extreme committee, which helps students who are deaf, deaf-blind or hard of hearing transition after school.

  • Working with Total Living Community, a senior citizen and retirement community.

Bob also continues to be a volunteer member of the National Association of the Deaf (NAD); Georgia Association of the Deaf-Blind (GADB); Georgia Association of the Deaf (GAD), Northwest Metro GAD Chapter; Georgia Council for the Hearing Impaired (GACHI); and the Georgia Rehabilitation Association (GRA).

 

Bob is described by his peers as kind, caring, patient and always willing to teach others. We commend Bob for his dedication to a variety of organizations and projects and are proud to present him with the Hamilton Relay 2014 Deaf Community Leader Award for the State of Georgia!

 

 

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Jeff Bonnell Receives Hamilton Relay
2014 Better Hearing and Speech Month
Recognition Award for the State of Georgia

 

Jeff Bonnell of Atlanta was selected by Georgia Relay and Hamilton RJeff Bonnellelay to receive the 2014 Better Hearing and Speech Month Recognition Award for the state of Georgia. Jeff generously devotes his time and knowledge to advocating and spreading awareness of available resources for individuals who are hard of hearing or deaf. Jeff is described by his peers as compassionate, upbeat and encouraging – always striving to improve the quality of life and offering tips on how to cope with hearing loss.

A retired Delta Airline employee, Jeff is currently the Georgia State Director for Hearing Loss Association of America (HLAA), as well as the leader of the Buckhead/Atlanta HLAA chapter. He has a regularly published column in The Resonator, the Georgia HLAA newsletter, and has been invited to speak at the 2014 HLAA National Convention where he will co-present  "Communication and Civility:  How They Make or Break Relationships" as part of the Relationships and Communication tract for state leaders.

In addition to speaking on a national level, Jeff is active in presenting on topics involving hearing loss within his local community. He is a member of the Area Agency for the Aging, where he advocates for individuals and shares information on how to live well with hearing loss. Jeff completed a two-year mentoring program through Gallaudet University and is now a certified peer mentor for the hard of hearing. Through his own experience with hearing loss, Jeff understands the concerns of others and encourages them to advocate for themselves and take advantage of available technologies and strategies for achieving better communication.

 We commend Jeff for his leadership, advocacy and volunteerism on behalf of individuals who are hard of hearing and are pleased to present him with the Hamilton Relay 2014 Better Hearing and Speech Month Recognition Award for the state of Georgia!

 

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Receive Captions on Every Call with Hamilton CapTel® for PC/Mac, Smartphones and Tablets

Backed by over a decade of proven captioned telephone technology, Hamilton CapTel® is dedicated to making phone conversations simple and accessible for individuals with hearing loss. In addition to a Hamilton CapTel phone, you can access real-time captions of your calls using a computer, smartphone or tablet. Below is an overview of how to access Hamilton CapTel from your PC/Mac, Smartphone or Tablet so that you can begin placing and receiving calls from anywhere!

Register for a Hamilton CapTel Account

The first step in accessing Hamilton CapTel on your PC/Mac, Smartphone or Tablet is to set up an account. This simple, one-time process allows you to place and receive captioned calls any time you are logged in with Hamilton CapTel. To register for a Hamilton CapTel Account, visit: www.HamiltonCapTel.com/Register.

When you register, you have the opportunity to obtain a Hamilton CapTel Call Me # which is a personal phone number that makes it possible to receive calls with captions whenever you are logged in to your account -- whether on a PC/Mac, Smartphone or Tablet. You can share your Call Me # with family, friends and businesses so that they can call you directly without first having to call the toll-free access number at the captioning center to reach you.

Once an account has been set up, you can choose any or all of the following options:

Hamilton CapTel for PC/Mac

See every word a caller says right on the screen of your PC/Mac. All that’s required is a computer with Internet browser, high-speed Internet, any phone, and your Hamilton CapTel Account.

On your PC/Mac, simply log in to your Hamilton CapTel Account by visiting www.HamiltonCapTel.com/Login.  Enter the telephone number of the phone you will be using for the call, as well as the telephone number of the person you are calling, then click on the “Place Call” button.

Hamilton CapTel for Smartphones

Hamilton CapTel for Smartphones lets you place and receive captioned calls on a single mobile device.  All that’s required is a compatible smartphone, the Hamilton CapTel App and your Hamilton CapTel Account. A hearing aid or cochlear implant compatible hands-free headset can be used to listen to what’s being said.

Search for Hamilton CapTel through the app store for your smartphone and download the app to your phone. To place a captioned call, simply open the Hamilton CapTel App and enter the number you are calling.  

Find out which smartphones and wireless networks are compatible with Hamilton CapTel by visiting: www.HamiltonCapTel.com and selecting the Smartphone Selector.

Hamilton CapTel for Tablets

Using your iPad or Android tablet, any telephone and a high-speed Internet connection, you can receive captions on the screen of your tablet. Download the Hamilton CapTel App from the app store for your tablet. To place a call, from the Hamilton CapTel App call screen, enter the number of the person you are calling in the "Number to Dial" box.

How does it work? 

In general, when you place a call from your PC/Mac, Smartphone or Tablet, once you click on “Place Call”, you will receive a call on your phone from the captioning center. You must answer this call in order to receive captions.  Once you answer, the number of the person you are calling will automatically be dialed.  A captioning screen will then appear on your PC/Mac, Smartphone or Tablet -- allowing you to view captions of everything the other person says.  As the call proceeds, you can listen to the extent you are able to and respond directly to the other person.

For more information:

To learn more about Hamilton CapTel, please visit
www.HamiltonCapTel.com.  

If you have questions or need assistance, please contact:
Hamilton CapTel Customer Care at 877-455-4227
or
info@hamiltoncaptel.com

 

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Learn More about Georgia Relay
at our Spring Outreach Events!



Georgia Relay’s outreach coordinator, Ellen Rolader, will be exhibiting at a number of community events this spring. If you are interested in learning more about Georgia Relay, CapTel (captioned telephone), or the Georgia Telecommunications Equipment Distribution Program (GATEDP), please visit the Georgia Relay table at any of these events!

April 25-26, 2014; Savannah
Georgia Statewide Coalition on Blindness
Center for Blind and Low Vision
214 Drayton St.

April 26, 2014; Woodstock
Cherokee Triad S.A.L.T. Council 8th Annual Senior Extravaganza
Cherokee Recreation & Parks Building
7545 Main St.

April 28, 2014; Atlanta
Cobb Senior Services Aging By Design Summit
Cobb Galleria
2 Galleria Pkwy SE

May 3, 2014; Macon
19th Annual Deaf Awareness Banquet
Vineville United Methodist Church
2045 Vineville Ave.

May 3, 2014; Macon
Georgia State Schools Title I Conference
Georgia Academy for the Blind
2895 Vineville Ave.

May 15, 2014; Douglas County
Douglas County Senior Picnic

May 16, 2014; Jonesboro
Clayton County Senior Services MayFest
Clayton County International Park
2300 Hwy 138 E

May 19, 2014; Atlanta
Georgia Seniors & Caregivers Expo
Atlanta History Museum
130 West Paces Ferry Rd NW

For a complete list of Georgia Relay’s upcoming events, please visit our Facebook page at Facebook.com/GeorgiaRelay. If you are interested in having Ellen exhibit at your community event, or present to your group, please contact her at
ellen.rolader@hamiltonrelay.com.



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Introducing the Hamilton Captel®  Call Me #

If you just can’t hear on the phone, now you can listen while reading captions of what is said to you on your smartphone, tablet or computer – with just one number to reach them all.

The Hamilton CapTel Call Me # is your personal phone number that makes it possible to receive captioned calls on your PC/Mac, smartphone and tablet. Share this single phone number with your family, friends and business contacts so that they can call you directly, without first having to dial a toll-free number.

Whether you are a seasoned pro or new to Hamilton CapTel, you are just three easy steps away from your new Hamilton CapTel Call Me #.

Already registered with Hamilton CapTel?
       1.    Log in to your account at www.HamiltonCapTel.com/login
  2.    Click on “Receive Calls”
  3.    Click on “Get your Hamilton CapTel Call Me # Today!”
   
New to Hamilton CapTel?
  1.    Visit www.HamiltonCapTel.com/login
  2.    Click on “Register” and then complete the form
  3.    Receive your new Hamilton CapTel Call Me # in a flash!

 

Please not that once you obtain a Call Me #, you will no longer be able to receive calls via the toll-free access number. To use Hamilton CapTel on your smartphone, it must have voice and data capability.

 

 

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Kelly Jenkins Receives Hamilton Relay 2013
Better Hearing and Speech Month Recognition Award
submitted by Hamilton Relay

Each May, in honor of Better Hearing and Speech Month, Hamilton Relay recognizes one individual who is hard of hearing, late deafened or has difficulty speaking and who has been a positive influence in Georgia, demonstrating commitment to advocacy, leadership and enhancing the lives of those around them. This year’s recipient of the Better Hearing and Speech Month Recognition Award is Kelly Jenkins.  

Kelly is a dedicated advocate for individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing in the state of Georgia. Specifically, much of her focus has been on improving the rights of children with hearing loss. Kelly experiences hearing loss herself and is a mother of three children, one of whom also experiences hearing loss.  

She is a co-founder of Let Georgia Hear, a parent-led advocacy group working toward passing legislation in Georgia that would require insurance companies to cover the cost of hearing aids for children. She has been in communication with several other states that are pursuing similar mandates and has also raised awareness for the rights of children with hearing loss through national and local TV networks and newspapers.  

Previously, Kelly served as the parent volunteer coordinator for the Atlanta Speech School Hamm Center and now serves on the School Board Guild and is the Special Projects Volunteer. She is also a board member for Georgia Hands & Voices, a non-profit organization that provides families with resources and information for improving communication access and educational outcomes for their children. Kelly also serves on the Policy and Funding Subcommittee for the Georgia Pathway to Language and Literacy Organization, which supports the advancement of literacy proficiency for the children of Georgia who are deaf or hard of hearing.  

Kelly has clearly demonstrated leadership and has contributed tremendously to children in the deaf and hard of hearing community. Congratulations, Kelly!

 

 

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Georgia Relay Partner:
Keeping Customers & Businesses Connected
submitted by Hamilton Relay

In an effort to help Georgia businesses provide better service to customers who are deaf, hard of hearing, deaf-blind or have difficulty speaking, Georgia Relay recently revised all of its training and marketing materials for the Georgia Relay Partner Program.

Open to all Georgia-based businesses, Georgia Relay Partner provides businesses of all sizes and types with free materials they need to answer and receive Relay calls with confidence, making it easier than ever for Relay users and Relay Partners to conduct business by phone.

Georgia Relay’s outreach coordinator, Ellen Rolader, is the point of contact for the Georgia Relay Partner program. She makes sure all new partners complete their training and receive their all-new partner kit, which includes:

·   A welcome letter from Ellen

·   A certificate to acknowledge that a business is an official Georgia Relay Partner

·   A detailed guide that explains Georgia Relay, the different types of Relay calls and how to place and receive them

·   A shorter version of the Partner Guide to distribute to employees

·   A flyer with tips for answering Relay calls

·   A flyer with advice for protecting a business from fraudulent Relay calls

·   A window decal to show customers that a business is a Georgia Relay Partner

·   A template article that a business can use to announce that it is now a Georgia Relay Partner

Partners also receive a listing on the Georgia Relay website so that Relay users are able to find businesses that are prepared to receive Relay calls. To find a list of current Georgia Relay partners or to learn more about the Georgia Relay Partner program, please visit www.georgiarelay.org or contact Ellen Rolader at ellen.rolader@hamiltonrelay.com.

 

 

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Hamilton Relay Now Accepting Applications
for 2013 High School Scholarship Program
submitted by Hamilton Relay

Hamilton Relay is now accepting applications for its 2013 High School Scholarship program. The program will award $500 to one graduating Georgia high school student who is deaf, hard of hearing, deaf-blind or has difficulty speaking.  

Established in 2010, the Hamilton Relay Scholarship Program is designed to support individuals who are deaf, hard of hearing, deaf-blind or have difficulty speaking in their post-secondary education. One scholarship is awarded annually in each of the states where Hamilton Relay is the contracted telecommunications relay service provider.

To be eligible for the 2013 Hamilton Relay Scholarship Program in Georgia, students must:

  1. Be a graduating high school student who is deaf, hard of hearing, deaf-blind or has difficulty speaking
  2. Be a resident of Georgia
  3. Complete and submit an application, an essay under the topic of communication technology and a letter of recommendation

Applications are available online at www.HamiltonRelay.com and must be postmarked by March 1, 2013 to be considered eligible for selection. The winner will be chosen by the end of April and announced during the month of May.

The Hamilton Relay Scholarship Program is just one of several national programs made available by Hamilton Relay to honor individuals who are making a difference in their communities. In addition to the high school scholarships, Hamilton offers a $1,000 scholarship to an undergraduate student at each of the following schools: Gallaudet, California State University Northridge and the National Technical Institute of the Deaf.  In May, Hamilton Relay will present the Better Hearing and Speech Month Recognition Award to individuals who are hard of hearing, late-deafened or have difficulty speaking and who have served as a strong influence within their state, and in September, Hamilton Relay will recognize individuals through Hamilton’s Deaf Community Leader Award during National Deaf Awareness Week.

“We enjoy recognizing the individual leaders and talented students who are involved in our programs,” says Dixie Ziegler, vice president of Hamilton Relay. “Every year, more and more nominations and applications pour in, and the amount of support and community involvement is tremendous.”

For more information about any of Hamilton Relay’s scholarship and award opportunities, please visit www.hamiltonrelay.com. For more information about Georgia Relay and its services, please visit www.georgiarelay.org or call 1-866-787-6710.

 

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Got a Smartphone?

submitted by Hamilton Relay

 

Smartphone

Thanks to FREE apps like these, a smartphone can be an incredibly powerful communications tool for deaf and hard-of-hearing users.  Download them now from your device’s apps store.


IP-Relay
IP-Relay from Purple Communications enables deaf or hard-of-hearing users to make and receive text relay calls. Calls are free and do not count against your monthly phone minutes.

(For Apple, Android and BlackBerry devices)

 

ntouch
Get video relay service on the go with ntouch, the app from Sorenson Communications that turns your smartphone into an instant videophone.

(For Apple and Android devices)

 

Hamilton Mobile CapTel
See exactly what is being said to you on every call with Hamilton Mobile CapTel, the app that translates your caller’s words into easy-to-read text captions. Ideal for hard-of-hearing or deaf people who want to make voice calls.

(For Apple, Android and Blackberry devices)

 

ConvoMobile
Enjoy video chat wherever you’re comfortable! ConvoMobile lets you call any videophone and features one-click Video Relay calling. It’s also the first mobile VRS app to have a 911 hot button.

(For Apple and Android devices)

 

Virtual Voice
Virtual Voice uses text to speech (TTS) and speech recognition features to enable deaf and speech-disabled users to communicate with others without the need for sign language or lip reading.

(For Android devices)

 

iSpeech
iSpeech converts text to speech and will even translate your text into 18 foreign languages, making it great for travel. Choose from a selection of voices.

(For Apple and Blackberry devices)

 

Dragon Dictate
Perfect for ASL users and late-deafened adults, Dragon Dictate changes voice to text captions, making it easy for deaf and hard-of-hearing users to communicate face-to-face with others.

(For Apple devices)

 

Skype
Video call and instant message anyone on Skype for free.

(For Apple, Android and BlackBerry devices)

 

Vibe
Feel who’s calling and texting you with Vibe, the app that uses vibration patterns to help you ID callers. Pick a contact and set or create a unique vibration pattern for them—it’s that easy! (For Android devices)

 

Deaf Note
Deaf Note replaces the need for pen and paper to write notes back and forth. Save or export your notes, change font sizes, and more.

(For Android devices)

 

Buzz Cards
Buzz Cards by Sorenson works like a deck of flash cards to help deaf users communicate more easily with those who don’t know sign language. Make and edit cards as needed, or create cards ahead of time for messages you use more often. Your cards are organized by category (e.g., “Dining” or “Travel”) to make them easy to find later.

(For Apple devices)

 

A complete list of Apps can be found at:

http://code-idea.org/index.php/accessibility-tools/applications

 

 

 

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Christopher Patterson Receives Hamilton Relay 2012 Deaf Community Leader Award for the State of Georgia

Each year in honor of Deaf Awareness Week (the final week of September), Hamilton Relay honors one individual in each state where it is the contracted relay service provider who is a leader in his/her local deaf community. Christopher Patterson of Athens is the 2012 Deaf Community Leader Award recipient for the state of Georgia.

Christopher was selected for his ability to guide positive change in Georgia’s deaf community and encourage empowerment for individuals who are deaf as well as his dedication towards both local and national deaf advocacyEllen Rolader with Christopher Patterson efforts.

Christopher is a strong advocate for communication accessibility and interpreting services for individuals who are deaf. He is the Region III representative for the National Association of the Deaf (NAD) and will be the chairperson for the NAD national conference to be held in Atlanta in 2014. Christopher was actively involved with the Georgia Advocacy Office to ensure that medical professionals have the resources to provide effective communication. He also worked to partner Georgia Association of the Deaf and Georgia Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf to host workshops for deaf individuals looking to become Certified Deaf Interpreters. Additionally, he advocated for the State of Georgia to accept American Sign Language (ASL) as a foreign language in the public schools.

Furthermore, Christopher advocated for the State of Georgia to adopt the Deaf Child Bill of Rights and was co-chair of the first Deaf Children’s Literacy Benefit Gala in Atlanta, Georgia. This event was a huge success which gained exposure to literacy issues surrounding children who are deaf.

“Christopher has been described by his peers as a warm and gracious individual who has the ability to listen and observe the needs of the community that surrounds him,” said Ellen Rolader, Georgia Outreach Coordinator, Hamilton Relay. “His ability to follow through in achieving the goals he has set forth for himself is impressive. Georgia is fortunate to have such an individual.”

Congratulations, Christopher!

 

 

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In the Loop: A Look at Hearing Loops and Telecoils

If you are one of the estimated 8.4 million Americans who wears a hearing aide on a daily basis, you may know that it can often still be difficult to hear in public places where background noise is common (such as a restaurants, airports or pharmacies), or in meeting places where the speaker is using a microphone (such as places of worship, presentation rooms or theaters). However, new technology may soon make much of America a friendlier place for people who live with hearing loss.

Just as WiFi allows people to connect to the Internet in connected public places, assistive listening devices such as induction hearing loops allow people wearing properly equipped hearing aids or cochlear implants to connect directly to public sound systems. A hearing loop consists of a microphone to collect sound, a transmitter to send the signal across a distance, a receiver to intercept the signal, and any one of several different listening attachments to send the sound from the receiver to the user’s ear, hearing aid or cochlear implant.

Today, most models of hearing aids and cochlear implants feature a small copper wire known as a telecoil or t-coil. Originally invented to boost magnetic signals from telephone handsets, t-coils are activated by a t-switch on the hearing aid or cochlear implant and enables the listener to receive the sound signal transmitted by the hearing loop directly in his/her ear while eliminating most background noise.

For those who do not use t-coils, hearing loops can also be accessed through portable receivers or headsets that are usually available to be checked out at public venues.

Hearing loops are already widely used overseas in places including Great Britain and Scandinavia, and thanks to advocacy efforts they are slowly becoming more popular in the United States. Last year, New York City Transit installed hearing loops in 488 subway information booths. Earlier this year, Nissan announced that 13,500 new city taxis will be equipped with hearing loops.

Access to public places for individuals with disabilities – including hearing loss – is required by the Americans with Disabilities Act. However, in order for hearing loops to become commonplace in the United States, more people need to be educated about the technology and advocate for its use. If you think an assistive listening device would benefit you on the job, in your classroom, at your place of worship or any place you attend regularly, find out the process from the institution for requesting accommodation (in private settings) or for auxiliary aids and services (in public settings).

For more information about hearing loops, contact the Hearing Loss Association of America or visit www.hearingloss.org.

 

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Introducing the New CapTel 840i

The newest innovation in CapTel® technology is now available from Georgia Relay: the CapTel 840i. Like its predecessor, the CapTel 800i, CapTel 840i allows individuals to call a CapTel user directly, without having to dial a toll-free access number first, making the entire process more similar to a regular phone call.

The CapTel 840i hooks up to your phone line like any other phone, but it also connects to your high-speed Internet access to automatically display captions of everything your caller says on all incoming and outgoing telephone calls.

Other new features and benefits of the CapTel 840i include:

 

 
Captions appear automatically on all calls – incoming and outgoing
Extra-large, easy-to-read captions window with adjustable font sizes and colors
Built-in answering machine – takes voice messages and shows you captions
Adjustable volume control for captioned calls
Captions can be turned on or off at any time during a call
One-touch access to CapTel Customer Service available 24 hours a day/7 days a week
Easy-to-follow menu system with Yes/No questions
Phone book allows you to easily store and dial more than 95 names and phone numbers
Speed dial keys for one-touch dialing of frequently called numbers
Caller-ID capable – shows you who is calling on the display screen
(Caller ID service is required)
Captions AES-encrypted for ultimate security


To use the CapTel 840i, you need landline telephone service (digital, DSL, VoIP or analog) and high-speed Internet access (WiFi or Ethernet cable).

CapTel 840i phones are available to Georgia residents through Georgia Relay
for the exclusive discounted price of just $99.

To find out more about CapTel, call 1-866-694-5824 (Voice/TTY)
or visit
www.georgiarelay.org.

Phones will soon be available at no cost to qualifying individuals through the Georgia Telecommunications Equipment Distribution Program (GATEDP).
To find out if you qualify, contact the Georgia Council for the Hearing Impaired (GACHI)
at 1-888-297-9461 (Voice/TTY) or visit
www.gachi.org.

CapTel is a registered trademark of Ultratec, Inc.

 

 

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The Gift of CapTel

The holiday season may be over, but it is always the perfect time of year to give the gift of a CapTel phone if you or your loved one is having difficulty hearing over the telephone. A CapTel phone (captioned telephone) works just like a traditional telephone, except that a typed transcript of the conversation appears on a brightly-lit display screen so that users can read every word as it is spoken.

CapTel can be a life-changing solution for people living with hearing loss.

Here is a letter from Gaye Miller Hill, who says that
her father’s new CapTel phone has made life happier for their entire family:

My dad, Robert Carroll Miller, is a great man and I missed his voice so much. About five years ago, my dad’s hearing impairment worsened to a point that he could no longer hear me when I phoned, so our phone conversations ended. This was a very sad day for me because my dad has so much wisdom and advice to share. He is a master gardener who could always answer my questions: What kind of fertilizer should I use or how to combat the bugs on the vegetable plants? Recently, my brother contacted me about phone services available for individuals with hearing impairments. I started the research and discovered the Georgia Council for the Hearing Impaired and began the process of acquiring telecommunications equipment. What a great day when Mr. Henry Carter arrived and installed the new phone for dad! My emotions surfaced when I talked by phone with dad for the first time. Dad beamed knowing that now he could talk to his family members whenever he wished. Now I can call him to ask advice, relay important information or more importantly just talk. What a blessing to hear his voice after five years of not being able to communicate by phone. Thanks to everyone who had a part in making life happier for my dad and his family.

-Gaye Miller Hill

CapTel service is free!...
and CapTel phones can be purchased at a special rate of just $99 through Georgia Relay.

For more information, please contact
Georgia Relay at 1-866-694-5824 (Voice/TTY) or visit
www.georgiarelay.org.

 

 

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Mobile CapTel
Lets Users See What They Say on Smartphones  

 

Georgia Relay would like to remind you that you can enjoy the convenience of CapTel wherever you happen to be with Hamilton Mobile CapTel for smartphones. Mobile CapTel allows you to read captions of what’s being said to you during conversations, providing word-for-word transcriptions displayed on your mobile device, similar to captions on a television. Mobile CapTel is free to use, available 24/7 and only requires three simple things:

1)    A compatible smartphone

2)    A hands-free headset that works with hearing aids/cochlear implants

3)    An account with Hamilton Web CapTel – requires a simple, one-time registration at www.hamiltonwebcaptel.com.  

 

With a wide variety of Android, Blackberry, and iPhone smartphones available on the market, Hamilton now provides a convenient Smartphone Selector to determine if your phone is compatible with Mobile CapTel. Just visit http://www.hamiltoncaptel.com/mobile_captel/smartphone_selector/, select your wireless network provider and your phone, and you will find all the information you need to get started with Mobile CapTel.  

 

The newest offering from Mobile CapTel is an app that is optimized for Android Tablets, allowing you to use your Android Tablet to read captions of your conversation while you listen and talk over the phone. To use the app, you will need to use your Android Tablet to download the Hamilton Mobile CapTel app from the Android Market and make sure you have registered for a Hamilton Web CapTel account. Once installed, you will be able to use Mobile CapTel to place and receive calls with your Android Tablet and any telephone (i.e. landline, office, cell phone or smartphone).  

 

To learn more about Mobile CapTel, the Smartphone Selector, or Mobile CapTel for Android Tablets, please visit www.hamiltonmobilecaptel.com.

 

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Hamilton Mobile CapTel Introduces a Free iPhone App

 Hamilton Relay, Georgia Relay’s service provider, has made available a free App for your iPhone—Hamilton Mobile CapTel—that provides captions for iPhone calls.

Available nationwide, Hamilton Mobile CapTel works just like a standard CapTel call, allowing users to listen while reading captions on their iPhone
of everything that is said during a call.

Hamilton Relay considers this free App a major addition to their solutions available for the hard of hearing. In the words of Dixie Ziegler, Vice President of Hamilton Relay, "every call is important, and due to the widespread use of the iPhone, we have created a free App that is easy to use, with an intuitive interface that meets the needs of iPhone users in the U.S.”

 Hamilton relay is dedicated to delivering the most technologically advanced solutions, and the Hamilton Mobile CapTel App certainly fits the bill. In addition to users being able to listen to what is being said and simultaneously read captions, this App delivers other convenient features, including:

  • Integration of contacts and phone numbers
  • Free captions in both English and Spanish
  • Compatibility with iPhone headsets—wired and Bluetooth
  • Immediate iPhone access to personal profile and contacts
    for registered Web CapTel users

Hamilton Mobil CapTel is currently available on any 3G/3GS iPhone. However, look for this App to become available on a variety of devices in the near future.

Download the free Hamilton Mobile CapTel iPhone App at the iTunes® App Store.
Search "Hamilton Mobile CapTel"
or download directly at:
http://iphone.appmobilize.com/track/185118

iPhone users who are new to CapTel can visit www.HamiltonCapTel.com for more details, or they may begin the one-time registration process at www.HamiltonWebCapTel.com.

 

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Georgia Relay Featured on People 2 People with Jocelyn Dorsey

Terri Byrd has a story familiar to many of us, but unknown to the general public. A bout with meningitis left her deaf at the age of three. Most television viewers are unfamiliar with how hard the deaf, hard of hearing and speech impaired have to work to enjoy the simple pleasures hearing persons take for granted.

However, thanks to a feature segment on WSBTV’s People 2 People with Jocelyn Dorsey, the hearing audience got a look into how Georgia Relay, the Georgia Council for the Hearing Impaired (GACHI) and the Georgia Telecommunication Equipment Distribution Program (GATEDP) made Terri’s life a whole lot easier.

It all began with a visit to GACHI. Terri was a TTY user, but wasn’t feeling as connected to the hearing world as she wanted to be. GACHI staff helped her complete an application for equipment, and also gave her resources for obtaining a hearing aid. All Terri had to bring with her was proof of income and Georgia residency, and proof of a home phone line.

Terri’s request was processed on the same day, and she qualified for free equipment. As Terri also showed proof of an Internet connection, she received a free CapTel 800i from GATEDP and free videophone from Sorenson.

GACHI soon distributed and installed Terri’s new equipment in her home. GACHI also trained her on the use of her new CapTel phone, and set up a signaler to Terri’s lamp.  And that was it—in just days, Terri had obtained the latest technology for the deaf, hard of hearing and speech impaired free of charge.

On the People 2 People segment, Terri expresses how grateful she is to Georgia Relay, GACHI and GATEDP. In her words, the equipment and services we provide brought her up “to the same level as hearing people.” And thanks to the cameras and crew of WSBTV, an entire television audience learned all we do for the deaf, hard-of-hearing and
speech-impaired community.

Terri’s interview can be found on WSBTV’s website, at www.wsbtv.com/video/24910514.

 

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Captioned Telephone - “See What They Say”

 

Just can’t hear on the phone?  Has making a telephone call become a task that you avoid or have other people do for you? If so, there is a solution available to help you reconnect to others via the phone. It’s called Captioned Telephone.   

 

Similar in concept to captioned television, Captioned Telephone allows you to use your own voice while you listen to and read captions of what is being said to you over the telephone.   

 

Captioned Telephone Service can change people’s lives. Comments from individuals who use the service include: “I could not use the phone before and now I use it all the time.” “It is a natural part of our lifestyle and without it, communication would be very limited.” “This is great. Now I can talk to my family where before someone had to call for me.” “I am enjoying my phone...I am looking forward to Captioned Telephone improving the quality of my life toward being more independent.”   

 

Captioned Telephone is a free service available through Georgia Relay, a public service provided by the State of Georgia and administered by the Georgia Public Service Commission. Georgia Relay makes telecommunication simple, dependable and convenient for people who are hearing, deaf, hard of hearing or speech disabled.  

 

The service works using a phone line and a confidential captioning service that visually displays everything the other party says during a conversation on the brightly lit screen of a CapTel® captioned telephone. The captions allow the user to read along with the spoken words. In this way, a person can engage in natural conversations with friends, businesses and loved ones, using their own voice and experiencing the independence of making calls without the assistance of the people in their lives. While the captioning service is free, a special CapTel phone is required.  

 

For more information, or to learn more about other telecommunication services available for Georgians who are deaf, hard of hearing or speech disabled, call Georgia Relay Customer Service toll free at 1-866-694-5824 (Voice/TTY) or visit www.GeorgiaRelay.org.  

 

CapTel is a registered trademark of Ultratec, Inc.

 

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CapTel Improving Lives in Georgia  

 

For many people living with hearing loss, using a telephone is often a stressful and frustrating endeavor. Whether attempting a routine call with family or friends, or a more intricate business conversation, conducting a normal phone conversation can be nearly impossible for someone who is unable to clearly understand what the person on the other end is saying.  

 

This is why Georgia Relay now offers captioned telephone technology – known as CapTel for short. Developed by UltraTec, the same company that produces TTYs (text telephones) for people who are deaf and hard of hearing, CapTel was introduced in Georgia in January 2008 and is revolutionizing the way many people communicate over the telephone. While not for everyone, this technology is ideal for those who are late-deafened and have understandable speech. The only equipment needed is a CapTel phone, which looks much like a standard telephone, except with a brightly-lit display screen.  

 

CapTel allows users to talk and listen to the person they have called while they receive a text version of the other person’s words displayed on their phone’s digital screen. As the conversation progresses, users can check their CapTel phone’s screen anytime to ensure accuracy. The captions appear nearly simultaneously as words are spoken, and the phone itself is as easy to use as a standard phone – callers just pick up the handset and dial the number they wish to call. Also, with the exception of the purchase price of the phone and any long-distance charges, there is no cost to use CapTel.  

 

CapTel phones are available for purchase at a discounted price of $99 (80% off of the standard retail price) exclusively through Georgia Relay. To download an order form, visit www.georgiarelay.org. If you do not have access to Internet, call 1-866-694-5824 (voice/TTY) to have an order form mailed to your home address.  

 

A limited number of free phones are available to people who are medically and financially qualified through the Georgia Telecommunications Equipment Distribution Program.  Call GACHI at 1-888-297-9461 (voice/TTY) or visit www.gachi.org for details.

 

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Ten-Digit Numbers

 

Ten-Digit Numbers for VRS and Internet Relay

What You Need to Know  

 

What is the new policy?

As of January 1, 2009, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) requires that all Video Relay and Internet Relay users obtain a 10-digit number. This number is just like the standard 10-digit number used by most voice telephone callers.  

 

What about continued support of seven-digit numbers?

Web CapTel and CapTel equipment and services support the use of both seven-digit and ten-digit numbers.  

 

Why was the change made?

There are many benefits to using a 10-digit number for VRS and IP Relay. First of all, it is now much easier to place a call to a VRS or IP Relay user. There is no more need for multi-step calling instructions, special extensions, “proxy” numbers or IP addresses. Now, anyone can simply pick up a voice telephone, dial a 10-digit number and be connected to any VRS or IP Relay user through that person’s preferred provider.   Secondly, every 10-digit number is assigned to its user’s physical geographic location. This means that in the event that a VRS or IP Relay user places an emergency call to 911, the user’s address is automatically routed to the 911 call center operator, who is able to dispatch emergency services to the appropriate location more quickly.  

 

What do I need to do?

If you are a VRS or IP Relay user, you must contact your preferred service provider and request to be assigned a 10-digit number. Once you receive your number, you must register this number with your current address through your provider. You will be able to change your service provider or update your location information at any time. After June 30, 2009 VRS and IP Relay services will not be available for anyone without a registered 10-digit number.  

 

How can I learn more?

Any Georgia Relay user who needs to obtain a 10-digit telephone number for VRS or IP Relay, needs to register a number with a current address, or would like to learn more may do so by contacting Georgia Relay at either V/TTY 1-866-694-5824 or www.georgiarelay.org.

 

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Hamilton Relay Launches Innovative Web Captioned Telephone (CapTel) for On-line Captioned Telephone Calls

Web Captioned Telephone Service Available Now for People with Hearing Loss Nationwide

 AURORA, NE – Hamilton Relay today announced the availability of Hamilton Web CapTel®CapTel is a service designed for individuals who have difficulty hearing on the telephone, where captions, similar to the closed captioning provided on most television programs, are offered to support the understanding of telephone conversations.  Previously available only through State Relay programs and with a specialized CapTel phone, individuals nationwide can now make CapTel calls via the Web.  Web CapTel works with any type of telephone and any type of Internet access device.  Hamilton Web CapTel is available at www.hamiltoncaptel.com

Hamilton Web CapTel requires no special equipment.  Along with a standard telephone or mobile phone, individuals can see every word a caller says on a computer screen.  All that is required is an Internet connection and a computer or laptop with a standard web browser — no special equipment or special software is needed.  Individuals can listen to the caller and read the written captions of everything the caller says. 

Hamilton Web CapTel works by providing two telephone numbers, your telephone number and the telephone number you wish to call. When you place a call, the Web CapTel Service calls your number first, then the number of the person you wish to call.  You will be able to see the captioning page from the computer monitor and once you answer your telephone, captions will begin and the system is calling out to the person you wish to call. When you are waiting to receive a call, a person dials Hamilton Web CapTel Service at 1-800-933-7219Web CapTel Service checks to see if you are logged on and waiting for calls, then places a call to your telephone number where you are waiting.

“Hamilton is thrilled to introduce Hamilton Web CapTel,” says Dixie Ziegler, Vice President of Hamilton Relay.  ”This exciting web-based service expands Hamilton’s CapTel offering by bringing the flexibility and mobility of the Internet to the CapTel experience that so many people have come to enjoy.  Individuals who have missed out on what was being said during a telephone conversation no longer need to.  Hamilton Web CapTel allows individuals with hearing loss to ‘see what they say.’ ”

Individuals will view telephone conversations word by word, phrase by phrase, on-screen as the conversation takes place.  There is no charge for using Hamilton Web CapTel.  

Individuals and organizations who would like more information are encouraged to contact a Hamilton Relay Representative at 800-618-4781 (Voice/TTY) or via Email at help@hamiltoncaptel.com.

About Hamilton Relay

Hamilton Relay offers a variety of services including Internet Relay, Video Relay, Wireless Relay and CapTel.  All services are available at www.hamiltonrelay.com.  Hamilton Relay provides traditional relay services to 15 states, the Island of Saipan and the Virgin Islands. 

 CapTel and Web CapTel are registered trademarks of Ultratec, Inc.

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Site updated: 04/28/2017